Ageless Skin from a Pill? A Secret to Save Your Skin from Accelerated Aging

By Steven V. Joyal, MD

Stopping  Heart DiseaseYou want flawless, smooth skin.

You don’t smoke, you drink plenty of water every day, and you eat a diet low in refined starches and sugars. You consume adequate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids from fish, walnuts, and flax seed. You apply expensive skin cleansers and moisturizers that promise ageless, beautiful skin. Of course, you’ve heard about the dangers of excessive sun exposure and the veritable explosion in cases of diagnosed skin cancer within the past decade, so you are prudent when venturing outdoors. You wear sunscreen whenever you go to the beach or spend extended time outside, wear a broad-brimmed hat, and minimize time spent during earth’s peak period for solar radiation (generally between 11AM and 3PM in late spring,  summer, and early fall). You obtain the benefits of vitamin D from supplementation with low-cost cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) as well as ingesting foods (e.g. salmon, mushrooms) rich in this critical hormone-vitamin rather than subjecting your skin to age-accelerating solar radiation.

However, do you guard against incidental solar radiation?

Most people are completely unaware that over 80% of lifetime sun exposure occurs unintentionally. Furthermore, those unsightly brown and tan age spots that occur on exposed areas of the skin are caused by accumulated sun exposure over many years.

Unless you never the leave the house if not slathered in high sun protection factor (SPF) sunscreen or make-up, ultraviolet radiation is aging your skin (not to mention increasing your risk of skin cancer). And don’t think that just because you use a so-called “long-lasting” topical sunscreen that is “water-proof” you’re safe – close scrutiny of scientific data reveals that although newer sunscreen formulas offer enhanced resistance to the effects of sweat and swimming, these topical formulas must be re-applied frequently for maximal protection.

However, an amazing, natural plant extract, when orally ingested, offers the promise of additional protection against the damaging effects of incidental solar radiation exposure with a strong scientific portfolio of evidence.

Polypodium leucotomos is a type of fern native to certain tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas such as Honduras. Experimental studies with extracts of polypodium leucotomos have shown potent antioxidant effects. Other experimental studies show that Polypodium leucotomos extract reduces pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemicals that damage tissues when produced in excess. For over thirty years, extracts of Polypodium leucotomos have been used in Europe, Central, and South America to protect against the damaging effects of skin sensitizers and ultraviolet light therapy for the treatment of patients with psoriasis, an inflammatory skin condition characterized by silvery plaques on the skin. A clinical study showed that psoriasis patients’ skin had significantly less damage from ultraviolet light when these volunteers were given an extract of Polypodium as compared with those study volunteers given placebo. Another clinical study in patients with vitiligo (a skin condition characterized by areas of unsightly skin color mottling) showed improvement in areas of skin depigmentation when treated with ultraviolet light and 250 mg. three times daily of Polypodium leucotomos extract compared with placebo.

Make no mistake – supplementing with Polypodium leucotomos extract will not protect your skin from sunburn if you decide to spend ten hours at Fort Lauderdale beach after hibernating indoors for three months of winter. However, this natural ingredient is a wonderful adjunct to an over-all skin saving regimen that helps preserve youthful skin tone and texture. Although Polypodium will not reverse the appearance of heavily sun damaged skin, this fern extract offers the promise of lessening the impact of incidental sun exposure, now and in the future, on our skin. Since about 80% of our lifetime accumulated sun exposure is incidental, Polypodium extract represents a breakthrough strategy in the form of a dietary supplement that can help guard our skin from accelerated aging.

Stopping Heart Disease: Seven Lifesaving Blood Tests Your Doctor Doesn’t Order!

By Steven V. Joyal, MD

Stopping  Heart Disease Consider a beautiful Sunday afternoon in springtime, the smell of flowers, trees, and grass emerging from a long winter.

Now, imagine the sudden onset of crushing pain across your rib cage, shortness of breath, and a cold sweat across your face and back. A beautiful spring day, interrupted by the classic symptoms of a heart attack!

If you don’t want this to happen to you, prevention is critical, and an important part of an over-all prevention strategy is to detect risk factors for heart disease early in the course of the disease. Although the symptoms of an acute heart attack may appear suddenly, the underlying disease (called coronary atherosclerosis) that ultimately results in a heart attack occurs over many years.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and about every 25 seconds one of us will suffer a heart attack.  Annual blood testing plays an important role in helping to identify risk factors early in the course of vascular disease. Regrettably, many doctors are not aware of several blood tests that offer great benefit at detecting cardiac risk factors beyond those detected with typical, routine testing. At your next physical, be sure to take this list of seven lifesaving blood tests with you so that you and your doctor can help identify heart disease risk factors early, rather than too late. 

1. HbA1c

Elevated blood sugar is a significant risk factor for heart disease, even if you don’t have diabetes. Routine testing usually includes a fasting blood sugar level, but a far more accurate measurement of your blood sugar control over a three-month period of time is the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test. This test is usually given only to diabetics, yet all of us need to fully understand the risks associated with high blood sugar.  If your HbA1c level is not optimal (over 5.7), you need to achieve better control over your blood sugar levels. Weight loss, exercise, and diet are three time-proven strategies of achieving better blood sugar control. Nutrients like cinnamon, soluble fiber, and the exotic-sounding Indian Ayurvedic herbal medicine Gymnema sylvestre can help, too.

2. Fibrinogen

Increasingly, scientists have discovered that inflammation plays a deadly role in most degenerative diseases.  Fibrinogen levels increase in response to inflammation in our body.  Recent studies suggest that elevated fibrinogen levels are an independent risk factor for heart disease and stroke in patients with decreased vascular circulation (peripheral artery disease).  If your fibrinogen levels are elevated, weight loss and physical activity can help. Also, consider fish oil, niacin, and folic acid, in addition to vitamins A and C, to support healthy fibrinogen levels.

3. Homocysteine

Elevated levels of homocysteine are associated with an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, bone fracture risk, and cognitive function including depression.  If your blood tests reveal elevated homocysteine levels, B-vitamins like folic acid, B12, and B6 can help support healthy homocysteine metabolism.

4. C-reactive protein

Elevated levels of C-reactive protein indicate your body is under assault from inflammation. This important test can help you ward off some of the most lethal diseases before they begin.  Studies suggest that C-reactive protein is a risk factor for a host of diseases including cardiac disease, macular degeneration and arthritic conditions.  For those with elevated CRP, a low dose of daily aspirin can be helpful.  Also, natural therapies like fish oil, L-carnitine, and soluble fiber can help support healthy levels of C-reactive protein.

5. TSH

Our thyroid gland is the master metabolic regulator of our key body functions.  Signs and symptoms of a significantly overactive or underactive thyroid are easy to recognize for most physicians. Studies show that mild thyroid disease can increase the levels of cholesterol in the blood, contribute to weight gain, and increase the risk of heart rhythm disturbances.  A screening test for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) starting at age 35, and every five years thereafter, is a good strategy to identify subtle thyroid malfunction early.

6. 25-hydroxy vitamin D

The remarkable benefits of vitamin D extend across the entire health spectrum. Produced in the skin during exposure to sunlight in the ultraviolet-B spectrum, vitamin D is also available as a low-cost dietary supplement (vitamin D3, cholecalciferol). Over thirty different cell types, including bone, vascular, brain, muscle, and immune system cells contain receptors for activated vitamin D. Recent scientific studies show that low levels of vitamin D are associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer (e.g. breast, prostate), cardiovascular disease, and even the flu. Despite the enormous health benefits associated with optimal vitamin D status, the vast majority of us are insufficient, with some research suggesting as much as 80% of the population may not have optimal blood serum levels. A simple blood test can detect your vitamin D status. If you avoid sun exposure out of concern over skin cancer and premature skin aging, the latest research suggests that you will need somewhere between 2,000-8,000 IU of supplemental vitamin D3 daily to achieve optimal serum levels.

7. Advanced lipoprotein profiling

The information you obtain with advanced lipoprotein testing provides a wealth of detail on important parameters of heart disease risk, much more than the standard cholesterol profile.  For example, we know that small, dense LDL-cholesterol particles are far more plaque-producing than large, fluffy LDL-cholesterol particles. A standard cholesterol test does not differentiate between small, dense LDL and fluffy, buoyant LDL. Another example is the so-called “good” cholesterol, HDL. Standard cholesterol tests do not tell us if you have more of the favorable HDL2 subclass of particles or the less favorable HDL3, while advanced lipoprotein tests evaluate for HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol. Several different types of advanced lipoprotein tests are available based upon your individual needs.

Stress, Immortality, and the Hormesis Hypothesis

Stress, Immortality, and the Hormesis Hypothesis

By Steven V. Joyal, MD

Stress, Immortality, and the Hormesis HypothesisIs low-level stress the secret to immortality?

Longevity scientists have long been puzzled by the fact that stress, when carefully applied, very often results in prolongation of lifespan rather than causing premature death.

We need to be careful by the manner in which we characterize or define stress in the context of lifespan extension. Stress, as a critical causal factor in lifespan extension, is best defined by the term hormesis. When stress, either internal or external, is applied to a living system at a relatively low level so that a beneficial biological adaptation occurs, we define this as hormesis. The capacity of a biological system to adapt and thrive in response to stress is critical to survival. In fact, aging itself can be characterized as the inability to adapt and respond successfully to stress.

We must differentiate chronic stress that overwhelms a biological system and results in damage and decay from the type of low-level stress of hormesis that contributes to a beneficial biological response. For example, chronic stress that causes large bursts of the hormones cortisol and “fight or flight” catecholamines like adrenaline accelerates the aging process and reduces lifespan. In contrast, low-dose radiation with gamma rays and beta radiation has been shown in several studies to stimulate natural chemical and biological processes that are actually protective against cancer.1-4 This may seem surprising to some, but low-level gamma radiation, rather than causing cancer and premature death, has been shown to suppress cancer induction from chemical carcinogens, oncogenic retroviruses, and viral oncogenes like ras and src.5,6

Significant lifespan extension as a result of calorie restriction is probably the best evidence in support of the hormesis hypothesis as applied to longevity. Animals that are calorie restricted are able to significantly suppress chemical and radiation-induced cancers as opposed to peer controls fed ad libitum. Calorie restriction in animals results in an increase in resistance to oxidative stress and the negative effects of excess inflammation as well as the deleterious impact of exhaustive physical exercise.

The beneficial biological response to oxidative stress in calorie restriction is particularly impressive. Animals under calorie restriction have reduced levels of oxidatively damaged proteins, lipids, and DNA. Calorie restricted animals have an amazing capacity to beneficially modify gene expression involved in glucose metabolism, protein synthesis, and cellular energy capacity. Gene expression in calorie restricted animals shows adaptations involving enhancement of detoxification, anti-inflammatory pathways, and DNA repair enzymes.

Do the impressive adaptive benefits of calorie restriction share a common pathway?

The hormesis hypothesis helps provide an answer.

The mild stress of calorie restriction rapidly turns on a variety of gene pathways critical for essential defense and survival of the organism. Gene expression studies show that calorie restricted animals rapidly turn on genes related to stress response and energy metabolism. For example, Lee et al showed that of 6,437 genes activated by calorie restriction, nearly 30% were related to energy metabolism and stress response.7 Hormesis as an explanation for the biological benefits of calorie restriction implies an adaptive mechanism through evolutionary biology. In order to survive, living systems must adapt to an ever-changing barrage of internal and external insults. The low-level stress of calorie restriction produces gene expression changes that create a variety of positive adaptive responses for longevity.

In addition to calorie restriction, other strategies may help mimic the hormetic response. Consistent, mild-to-moderate (never exhaustive) exercise triggers a variety of adaptive mechanisms similar to calorie restriction. Exercise adaptation includes improvements in insulin signaling, mitochondrial energy metabolism, and resistance to oxidative stress, all of which are also known to occur with calorie restriction.

Nutrients, too, have hormetic properties. One example is vitamin D. The past decade has seen a veritable explosion of research supporting beneficial biological roles for vitamin D in the immune system, cardiovascular system, central nervous system, and endocrine system, in addition to control of the cell cycle and cancer pathogenesis.8 There is compelling evidence that vitamin D acts as a hormetic agent. Low doses of vitamin D exert stimulatory effects upon wound healing, while large doses may inhibit psoriatic plaque. A longitudinal, nested, case-control study of prostate cancer showed that both low (</=19 nmol/l) and high (>/=80 nmol/l) 25(OH)-vitamin D serum concentrations were associated with higher prostate cancer risk, while serum concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D within the 40-60 nmol/l range comprised the lowest risk of prostate cancer.9 A biphasic, U-shaped response curve is a characteristic of hormesis.

Clearly, more research is needed to understand how best to evaluate the hormesis hypothesis as applied to calorie restriction, physical exercise, and nutrients like vitamin D in the context of longevity science. In the interim, we are left with the intriguing possibility that stress, when applied carefully and strategically, may be the key to living healthier, longer.

References:

  1. Mitchel REJ. Low doses of radiation are protective in vitro and in vivo: Evolutionary origins. Dose-response. 2006;4(2):75–90.
  2. Mitchel REJ. Low doses of radiation reduce risk in vivo. Dose-Response. 2007;5(1):1–10.
  3. Sakai K, Nomura T, Ina Y. Enhancement of bio-protective functions by low dose/dose-rate radiation. Dose-Response. 2006;4(4):327–332.
  4. Sakai K, Hoshi Y, Nomura T, Oda T, Iwasaki T, Fujita K, Yamada T, Tanooka H. Suppression of carcinogenic process in mice by chronic low dose rate gamma-irradiation. Int J Low Radiat. 2003;1(1):142–146.
  5. Bauer G. Low dose radiation and intercellular induction of apoptosis: potential implications for control of oncogenesis. Int J Radiat Biol. 2007;83(11–12):873–888.
  6. Jürgensmeier JM, Schmitt CP, Viesel E, Höfler P, Bauer G. Transforming growth factor beta treated normal fibroblast eliminate transformed fibroblasts by induction of apoptosis. Cancer Res. 1994;54(2):393–398.
  7. Lee CK, Klopp RG, Weindruch R, Prolla TA. Gene expression profile of aging and its retardation by caloric restriction. Science. 1999;285(5432):1390-3.
  8. Norman AW. From vitamin D to hormone D: fundamentals of the vitamin D endocrine system essential for good health. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008;88(2):491S-499S.
  9. Tuohimaa P, Tenkanen L, Ahonen M, Lumme S, Jellum E, Hallmans G, Stattin P, Harvei S, Hakulinen T, Luostarinen T, Dillner J, Lehtinen M, Hakama M. Both high and low levels of blood vitamin D are associated with a higher prostate cancer risk: a longitudinal, nested case-control study in the Nordic countries. Int J Cancer. 2004;108(1):104-8.

Men should not stop using Avodart because of heart attack fears! Life Extension’s Rebuttle

Life Extension’s rebuttal by William Faloon in reference to published clinical study in Thursday’s New England Journal of Medicine on Avodart and increased risk for sudden myocardial infarction.

I suspect none of the study participants where using testosterone creams, even though they were ALL likely to be testosterone deficient. You will soon read the findings of an internal study we did on Life Extension Foundation members that found 86% of men have less than optimal testosterone levels.

The significance of this is that testosterone deficiency predisposes a man to heart failure. By taking a drug like Avodart when in a testosterone deficient state, the heart muscle will be robbed completely of this vital anabolic hormone. That may be why this study showed higher heart failure rates in the Avodart group.

 Those with prostate cancer often intentionally suppress their testosterone levels and have to be extra vigilant in protecting against heart attack. Log on to http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2009/mag2009_05.htm for information on how to protect against multiple risk factors underlying coronary atherosclerosis.

 Aging men (without prostate cancer) should do whatever is necessary to maintain free testosterone blood levels of 20-25 pg/mL, while keeping DHT blood levels at the very low end of the reference range.

This provides the heart, brain and other vital parts their testosterone requirements while protecting the prostate gland against the adverse effects of excess DHT.

 The Avodart study exposes the flaws in so many of these single agent trials. We know, for example, that 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels strongly predict prostate cancer risk. If this potent confounding factor was not accounted for, then the results shown with Avodart have little meaning.

If, for example the placebo group’s median 25-hydoxyvitamin D level was 35 ng/mL, and the Avodart group was only 25 ng/mL, this would skew the results in a way to show Avodart less effective than it may really be. Dietary intakes of cruciferous vegetables would have an equally significant confounding effect.

 Bill Faloon

Resveratrol May Reverse Arterial Aging

Resveratrol

“Atherosclerosis is reversible” is not a phrase we expected to hear from mainstream medical researchers until very recently—since these are the precise opening words of a remarkable editorial about resveratrol that appeared in a recent issue of the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine. Just as astonishingly, the editorial was written by a renowned immunologist, Linda K. Curtiss, PhD, of the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. The fact that an immunologist is writing about cardiovascular disease in a trend-setting medical journal speaks volumes about how far we have come in our understanding of chronic diseases and their relationships with inflammation, which is an immune system phenomenon. What truly sets Dr. Curtiss’s article apart, though, is her description of a dramatic new phenomenon mediated by the grape polyphenol resveratrol.

Curtiss’s excitement comes from work done by Cleveland Clinic cell biologist Young-Mi Park, MD, who was exploring the role of oxidant stress and inflammation on the pathogenesis, or disease-causing mechanisms, of atherosclerosis. Knowing that fat-laden inflammatory cells called foam-cell macrophages trigger inflammation when they become trapped beneath the lining of blood vessels, Park’s team sought to understand why the cells become trapped, and how they could be freed from their “endothelial bondage,” thereby reversing the inflammatory process.

The most natural approach to take, Park’s group decided, was simply to test known antioxidants’ ability to prevent the foam cells from migrating into the endothelial lining in the first place, and their ability to release any cells that were already present. Specifically, they studied how oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) promotes foam-cell formation and impairs migration. To do this they blocked LDL oxidation with several potent antioxidants. They found that oxidized LDL actually triggered production of a sort of cellular “glue” in the form of filaments of actin, one of the proteins also found in muscle tissue. The actin filaments were entangling the foam cells, preventing their natural migration out of the endothelial lining, leading to progressive inflammatory changes.

Park’s group chose resveratrol as one of the two antioxidants to test—another testimony to the respect that mainstream researchers are according this remarkable molecule (the other was N-acetylcysteine, also an antioxidant available in supplement form). Resveratrol treatment of the foam cells inhibited production of reactive oxygen species by greater than 90%, an important first step in breaking the cycle. Even more impressively, resveratrol supplements partially restored the foam cells’ ability to move out of the entangling actin filaments, and migrate away from the endothelial lining!

This brings us back to Dr. Curtiss’s astounding initial observation that atherosclerosis is a reversible condition—through the use of powerful antioxidants such as resveratrol, we can now understand how oxidized LDL contributes to invasion of endothelium by inflammatory cells, and how prevention or reversal of LDL oxidation promotes mobilization of inflammatory cells and their emigration away from vessel linings.

As Dr. Park concluded, “[these studies] also provide additional mechanistic support for the atheroprotective effect of antioxidants.” Resveratrol is already well-known as a cardiovascular protective supplement—the work of Park and others is now showing us that resveratrol must also be considered a valuable cardiovascular therapeutic supplement, one that can literally “turn back the clock” on chronic vascular diseases of aging!

Enhanced Irvingia: A Multi-Pronged Approach to Achieving Healthy Body Weight

IrvingiaIt’s not your fault! Public health agencies blame gluttonous behavior and lack of physical activity as the sole reasons for today’s obesity epidemic. Ignored are a plethora of age-related metabolic changes that predispose us to weight gain, even when we try to cut back on caloric intake.

The good news is that that you don’t have to do it alone. Scientists have identified natural compounds that function via multiple mechanisms to combat the underlying factors involved in excess accumulation of body fat.

New Green Tea Phytosome

The effects of green tea polyphenols in inhibiting the breakdown and absorption of dietary fats have been demonstrated in several studies. More recent research confirms the metabolic-enhancing properties of a proprietary green tea phytosome that is absorbed into the bloodstream better than conventional green tea products.

A human clinical trial documents 30 pounds of weight loss and a 10% reduction in waist circumference in 90 days when 300 mg/day of this new green tea phytosome is taken in conjunction with lifestyle modification.1 The placebo group that followed the same lifestyle modification program lost only 9.9 pounds and only 5% of their waist size. This new green tea phytosome provides two important components of a comprehensive weight-loss program.

Inhibiting the Alpha-Amylase Enzyme

Aging reduces our ability to utilize the carbohydrates (and fats) that constitute what most would consider part of a healthy diet. The result is that as we grow older, our bloodstreams become chronically overloaded with glucose and triglycerides that not only make it difficult to shed fat pounds, but also create vascular problems. A proven method to maintain healthy blood glucose is to neutralize the alpha-amylase enzyme in the intestines.

A natural bean extract (Phaseolus vulgaris) inhibits alpha-amylase. In a human trial in which all overweight participants were placed on a 2,000-2,200-calorie, carbohydrate-rich diet, those taking Phaseolus vulgaris lost 6.5 pounds and 1.2 inches in waist size in only 30 days compared with 0.8 pounds and 0.2 inches in the placebo group.2

Inhibiting the Alpha-Glucosidase Enzyme

Maintaining healthy blood glucose (and triglyceride) usually requires more than just inhibiting the alpha-amylase enzyme. Another intestinal enzyme that enables carbohydrate absorption is alpha-glucosidase. A patented seaweed extract (InSea2™) has demonstrated potent inhibiting effects against alpha-glucosidase and alpha-amylase. When given to laboratory animals, this seaweed extract reduced after-meal (postprandial) disorders by up to 90% compared with non-supplemented animals. Equally impressive were insulin reductions as much as 40% in the animals supplemented with InSea2™.

Chronically elevated insulin levels, as observed in overweight and obese individuals, can preclude fat loss. Excess glucose converts to triglycerides, which is the primary form that fat is stored in the body. By consuming compounds that inhibit the glucosidase and amylase enzymes before meals, the rate of carbohydrate absorption can be significantly slowed, resulting in reduced conversion of glucose to stored body fat.

Remember, young healthy individuals rapidly convert ingested fats-sugars into energy. Age-related changes reduce our metabolic capacity to efficiently utilize dietary sugars-fats, ergo the importance of impeding their absorption to help maintain a healthy body weight in maturing individuals.

Restoring Leptin Sensitivity

Fat cells (adipocytes) secrete a hormone called leptin that tells our brain we have eaten enough. Leptin can also facilitate the breakdown of stored triglycerides in our adipocytes via the process of lipolysis. Heavy individuals have startlingly high blood levels of leptin, indicating that their cells have become resistant to the leptin that is supposed to prevent them from putting on so many fat pounds.

An extract from a West African food called Irvingia gabonensis has been shown to restore leptin sensitivity by suppressing inflammatory factors. In a recently published study, Irvingia demonstrated a marked reduction in leptin blood levels, a reduction in appetite, followed by significant loss of body weight and inches off the waistline.3 In addition to restoring leptin sensitivity, Irvingia has demonstrated the following fat-reducing mechanisms:

  • Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is the enzyme that converts blood glucose to triglycerides in fat cells. Irvingia has the unique effect of inhibiting glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase,4 thus reducing the amount of blood glucose that converts to stored body fat.
  • Irvingia has alpha-amylase-inhibiting properties5 (like InSea2™ and Phaseolus vulgaris), thus slowing the rate of carbohydrate absorption from the intestines.
  • Adiponectin is a hormone involved in helping to maintain insulin sensitivity on the membranes of energy-producing cells. Heavy individuals have low adiponectin blood levels, which contribute to the phenomenon of insulin resistance. Irvingia has been shown to significantly increase adiponectin blood levels.4

The New Enhanced Irvingia with Calorie Control Complex

In reviewing the remarkable effects demonstrated by these natural compounds, one might think that any one of them might be a solution to one’s weight problem. The reality is that aging individuals often have many obesity factors that can sabotage the best weight-loss programs.

The new Enhanced Irvingia formula provides a combination of nutrients that combat age-related fat accumulation via the following seven distinct mechanisms:

  1. Enhancing resting energy expenditure at the cellular level.
  2. Impeding dietary fat absorption from the intestines.
  3. Inhibiting alpha-amylase to slow intestinal carbohydrate absorption.
  4. Inhibiting alpha-glucosidase to further slow intestinal carbohydrate absorption.
  5. Enhancing leptin sensitivity to reduce hunger and stimulate adipocyte lipolysis.
  6. Elevating adiponectin blood levels to help restore insulin sensitivity.
  7. Suppressing glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase to reduce the amount of blood glucose that is converted to stored fat (triglyceride) in the cells.

Two capsules of Enhanced Irvingia with Calorie Control Complex provide:

  • Green Tea Phytosome (decaffeinated) extract 150 mg
  • Phaseolus vulgaris white kidney bean extract 445 mg
  • InSea2™ seaweed extract 125 mg
  • Irvingia gabonensis extract 150 mg

Directions are to take two capsules before the two heaviest meals of the day. A bottle of 120 capsules of Enhanced Irvingia with Calorie Control Complex retails for $78. If a member buys four bottles, the cost is only $54 per bottle. To order Enhanced Irvingia with Calorie Control Complex, call 1-800-544-4440 or go to our Enhanced Irvingia supplement page.

Summary of Human Studies With Enhanced Irvingia Ingredients
Ingredient Study Treatment vs. Placebo
Green Tea Phytosome Extract1 100 overweight subjects placed on a hypocaloric diet (men: 1,850 calories; women: 1,350 calories) randomized to receive 300 mg/day of green tea phytosome extract or placebo for 90 days Weight loss: 30.1 pounds vs. 9.9 poundsWaist size reduction: 10% vs. 5% (14% vs. 7% in men)
Phaseolus vulgaris2 60 overweight subjects placed on a 2,000-2,200 calorie, carbohydrate-rich diet and randomized to either 445 mg/day of white kidney bean extract or placebo for 30 days Weight loss: 6.5 pounds vs. 0.8 poundsWaist size reduction: 1.2 inches vs. 0.2 inches
Integra-Lean™ Irvingia gabonensis Extract3 102 overweight subjects randomized to either 150 mg of Irvingia twice daily or placebo for 10 weeks Weight loss: 28 pounds vs. 1.5 poundsWaist size reduction: 6.4 inches vs. 2.1 inches

References

1. Integr Nutr. 2008;11(2):1-14.

2. Int J Med Sci. 2007;4:45-52.

3. Lipids Health Dis. 2009 Mar 2;8:7.

4. Lipids Health Dis. 2008 Nov 13;7:44.

5. Ann Nutr Metab. 1993;37(1):14-23.

Note: Supplements should be taken in conjunction with a healthy diet and regular exercise program. Results may vary.

Caution: This product is designed to target several critical factors involved in age-related weight gain. Those who ingest more calories than what their body has the metabolic capacity to utilize will not see results. This is because some people are ingesting so many excess calories that no matter how much their metabolic rate is increased, or how much improvement occurs in their post-meal blood sugar and serum triglyceride levels, or by how much youthful insulin sensitivity and other body fat-regulating systems are restored, they are overwhelming the metabolic capacity to utilize these calories. This will result in excess calories being stored in adipocytes. One cannot consume limitless calories and expect to shed fat pounds by taking drugs, nutrients, and/or hormones that demonstrate weight-loss effects in clinical studies.

To order Enhanced Irvingia with Calorie Control Complex, call 1-800-544-4440 or visit www.lifeextension.com

Irvingia: Why Are So Many Americans Overweight?

Irvingia A debate has raged for decades about the best way to lose weight. After you read this, you will understand why even aggressive “diets” have failed to achieve significant fat loss.

Scientists have identified specific biological mechanisms that cause aging people to gain weight … no matter how little they eat. The problem has been that there was no way to circumvent the underlying factors that cause excess body fat … until now! As you are about to learn, gaining control over your body’s command signals is critical to maintaining a healthy weight.

Fat Accumulator #1 – Leptin Resistance

Leptin is a hormone that tells our brain that we have consumed enough calories and can stop eating. Leptin also induces a process whereby fat stored in cells is broken down. As we age, our cells (including the appetite control center in our brains) become “leptin resistant.” This means that leptin is unable to effectively regulate body weight.

Fat Accumulator #2 – Extra Large Fat Cells

Adult-onset weight gain is characterized by the enlargement of existing adipocytes (fat cells) that store too much fat. The size of fat cells is controlled by gene transcription factors. Fat cell size is closely related with adiponectin expression — with reduced adiponectin expression in larger fat cells. In addition, gene transcription factors help regulate adiponectin, and this crucial hormone is critical for supporting insulin sensitivity.

Fat Accumulator #3 – Excess Activity of a Fat Converting Enzyme

An enzyme called glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is critical for synthesizing (making) fatty acids in our bodies. Suppressing this enzyme helps reduce the amount of glucose (sugar) in our bloodstream from being converted into fatty acids.

4 WAYS TO ACHIEVE HEALTHY WEIGHT

Weight loss utilizing diet modification, supplements, hormones or drugs usually functions via a single mechanism. Adipocytes (fat cells), on the other hand, possess numerous means to ensure their survival. An extract from a West African plant called Irvingia has been shown to help maintain healthy body weight in four ways:*

1. Reversing Leptin Resistance:

Fat cells produce C-reactive protein, a pro-inflammatory compound that leads to “leptin resistance.” Overweight people given Irvingia have lower levels of CRP, and therefore less CRP is able to block the activity of leptin. Leptin is important in weight management because it promotes the breakdown of fat in adipocytes and tells the brain to turn off chronic hunger messages.

2. Increasing Adiponectin:

Large fat cells secrete less adiponectin, and adiponectin is a crucial hormone that helps support insulin sensitivity as well as cardiovascular health. Overweight people given Irvingia show markedly increased adiponectin levels.

3. Inhibiting the Fat Converting Enzyme:

An enzyme called glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase facilitates the conversion of glucose into triglycerides that increase adipocyte size. Irvingia inhibits glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, thus reducing the amount of glucose (sugar) that is converted to fat in the body.

4. Reducing Carbohydrate Absorption:

In order for carbohydrates to be fully absorbed, they must be broken down in the digestive tract by the amylase enzyme. Irvingia inhibits amylase, and thus reduces the amount of ingested starches that will be absorbed as sugar.

28 pounds lost in ten weeks

Several studies demonstrate the weight loss properties of Irvingia.1 In the largest placebo-controlled human study, those taking Irvingia lost 28 pounds over a 10-week period compared to less than 3 pounds in the placebo group.2,3

References:

  1. Lipids Health Dis. 2005 May 25;4:12.
  2. Nutrition J. 2008 (Submitted)
  3. 5th International Conference on Functional

    Foods for Chronic Diseases: Obesity & Related

    Diseases. Presented 2008 Oct 17.

How to use Irvingia

Based on impressive human data, a dose of 150 mg of Integra-Lean™ Irvingia taken twice a day is all that was needed to achieve unprecedented clinical results. A bottle containing 60 150-mg capsules of patented Integra-Lean™ Irvingia extract retails for $56.00. If a member purchases four bottles (a 16-week supply) during the Super Sale, the price is reduced to only $32.40 per bottle.

There is also a combination of Integra-Lean™ Irvingia and Fucoxanthin-Pomegranate Seed Oil available called SlimSignals™. Each softgel provides 150 mg of Irvingia plus Fucoxanthin-Pomegranate Seed Oil. Fucoxanthin functions to increase non-stimulating thermogenesis (fat burning) in adipocytes, while pomegranate seed oil reduces blood supply to adipocytes. The combination of Integra-Lean™ Irvingia plus Fucoxanthin-Pomegranate Seed Oil may provide superior benefits, but there are no studies where both were used together. A 60-softgels bottle of SlimSignals™ retails for $72.00.

To order Integra-Lean™ Irvingia at low prices, call 1-800-544-4440 or visit http://www.lef.org/Irvingia

Note: Supplements should be taken in conjunction with a healthy diet and regular exercise program. Results may vary.

Caution: This product is designed to target several critical factors involved in age-related weight gain. Those who ingest more calories than what their body has the metabolic capacity to utilize will not see results. This is because some people are ingesting so many excess calories that no matter how much their metabolic rate is increased, or how much improvement occurs in their post-meal blood sugar and serum triglyceride levels, or by how much youthful insulin sensitivity and other body fat-regulating systems are restored, they are overwhelming the metabolic capacity to utilize these calories. This will result in excess calories being stored in adipocytes. One cannot consume limitless calories and expect to shed fat pounds by taking drugs, nutrients, and/or hormones that demonstrate weight-loss effects in clinical studies.